Activist Spotlight: Christina Lizzi

Christina Lizzi

Christina Lizzi is the president of Students for Fair Trade, a student group from George Washington University that is affiliated with the Student Trade Justice Campaign. She helped to bottom-line the "Lame Duck Lame Deal — No Peru FTA" lobby day in DC. You can use the form below to send a thank you to Christina and urge her to keep up the good work!

 

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Christina Lizzi, a native of Zelienople, Pennsylvnia, is a junior at the George Washington University in Washington D.C., where she is the current president of George Washington Students for Fair Trade. Christina has helped to coordinate the activities of GW Students for Fair Trade with the Student Trade Justice Campaign a national student movement that has been working diligently as part of the broad coalition opposing the national Peru FTA.

When it became clear in September of 2006 that the Bush administration and the Republican leadership in Congress were intent on planning a vote during the lame-duck session of Congress, Christina and GW Students for Fair Trade sprang into action. In coordination with Public Citizen, the American Friends Service Committee, and the Student Trade Justice Campaign, the GW students began preparing for a post-election “Lame Duck Lame Deal – No Peru FTA Lobby Day” on Capitol Hill.

Christina organized a delegation of several dozen students for the lobby day. Each student requested a meeting with his or her congress-person and two senators. The group designed and ordered matching union-made T-shirts to wear in the halls of Congress that would amplify their presence. Take a look at the design here.

With the help of the students, other citizen lobbyists and religious leaders from the Interfaith Working Group on Trade and Investment, over 400 congressional offices were visited on the lobby day!

Christina says that the lobby day was the first time that many new GW Students for Fair Trade members had ever participated in politics. She was deluged with feedback from participants who told her how empowering and refreshing the experience was. “The Lobby Day was a big step for many of our members towards real long-term political activism.”

And now, as icing on the cake, after the lobby day, the Peru FTA has been pulled from consideration in the lame-duck Congress, and the debate delayed until next year – giving Christian and the GW Students for Fair Trade even more time to organize.

Christina’s interest in trade began her freshman year in college when she heard a classmate discuss the systematic problems that have caused poverty in Haiti. She then saw first hand the extent to which macro policies impact everyday life when she studied abroad in Nairobi, Kenya. In Kenya, Christina spent nearly three months living with a host family, after which she worked at an orphanage. This gave her a completely different perspective on trade policy, and also of the importance of taking action at the local level to make change.

One of Christina’s favorite things about being part of STJC is the level of enthusiasm and devotion people have towards making a difference. Everyone is willing to share their knowledge with newcomers, and she says this support has given her confidence in her involvement.

You can help Christina and GW Students for Fair Trade in their efforts to force the Bush administration to re-negotiate the Peru and Colombia trade deals by contacting YOUR member of Congress and urging him or her to oppose the agreements unless they are re-negotiated.

If you have another moment, please use the form below to send Christina a short note of thanks for her hard work and encouragement for the work she has ahead of her.

 



December 22, 2014

Subject:
Thank you, Christina!





We will add your signature from the information you provide.
 


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Activist Spotlight: Christina Lizzi