Keep Austin Energy Governance Accountable to the People

A proposed resolution would start the process of moving oversight and governance responsibilities away from the City Council and placing them with an appointed board. An appointed board could be much more easily influenced by industry interests that don’t share our values.

Austin Energy has been a leader in renewable energy and energy efficiency, while keeping rates competitive with other utilities in the state. This could all change if the wrong people were appointed to the proposed board.

The best solution would be to form a subcommittee of our soon to be expanded City Council to focus on governance and oversight of Austin Energy. An elected representative of Austin Energy customers who live outside city limits could be included to ensure everyone has a voice.

Send an email to the City Council now and then consider joining us at City Hall (301 W. 2nd St.) on Tuesday and/or Thursday.

  • On Wednesday, February 13, there will be a press conference and rally at 12:30 p.m. in front of City Hall. Please join us!
  • On Thursday, February 14, Austin City Council will meet at 10 a.m. to consider this proposed resolution. Attend the meeting and sign up to speak against the resolution.

Send your letter to City Council now.

Lee Leffingwell

Mayor of Austin

Austin, TX

Sheryl Cole

Mayor Pro Tem of Austin

Austin, TX

Chris Riley

Austin City Council Member

Austin, TX

Mike Martinez

Austin City Council Member

Austin, TX

Kathie Tovo

Austin City Council Member

Austin, TX

Laura Morrison

Austin City Council Member

Austin, TX

Bill Spelman

Austin City Council Member

Austin, TX

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