Ask Your Senators and Representative to Support the Democracy Is For People Constitutional Amendment

Overturn Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission and Create a More True Democracy

U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and U.S. Congressman Ted Deutch (D-Fla.) have introduced a powerful constitutional amendment that would prevent corporations from spending to influence elections and would enable to government to regulate campaign spending from individuals.

This amendment is key in our work to overturn the Supreme Court’s disastrous ruling in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission and we’re honored that they named it after our campaign, Democracy Is For People.

Please take a minute to send an email to your representative and senators and ask for them to join Sen. Sanders and Rep. Deutch in co-sponsoring the Democracy Is For People amendment.

The Democracy Is For People amendment is an essential piece of the puzzle.

Urge Your Members of Congress to Co-sponsor the Democracy Is For People Amendment.

 

Type your zip code into the box below. Then, take a moment to add your own words to the email message that appears. This greatly increases the likelihood that your message will make a difference. We also urge you to follow up your message by calling your representative and senators. The phone number for the U.S. Capitol Switchboard is (202) 224-3121. If you call, let us know how it went by sending an email to amendment@citizen.org.


Spread the Word


share on Facebook


The Democracy Is For People Constitutional Amendment:


SECTION I. Whereas the right to vote in public elections belongs only to natural persons as citizens of the United States, so shall the ability to make contributions and expenditures to influence the outcomes of public elections belong only to natural persons in accordance with this Article.

SECTION II. Nothing in this Constitution shall be construed to restrict the power of Congress and the States to protect the integrity and fairness of the electoral process, limit the corrupting influence of private wealth in public elections, and guarantee the dependence of elected officials on the people alone by taking actions which may include the establishment of systems of public financing for elections, the imposition of requirements to ensure the disclosure of contributions and expenditures made to influence the outcome of a public election by candidates, individuals, and associations of individuals, and the imposition of content neutral limitations on all such contributions and expenditures.

SECTION III. Nothing in this Article shall be construed to alter the freedom of the press.

SECTION IV. Congress and the States shall have the power to enforce this Article through appropriate legislation.

Learn More


Copyright © 2014 Public Citizen. All rights reserved. This Web site is shared by Public Citizen Inc. and Public Citizen Foundation.
Learn More about the distinction between these two components of Public Citizen.


Public Citizen, Inc. and Public Citizen Foundation

Together, two separate corporate entities called Public Citizen, Inc. and Public Citizen Foundation, Inc., form Public Citizen. Both entities are part of the same overall organization, and this Web site refers to the two organizations collectively as Public Citizen.

Although the work of the two components overlaps, some activities are done by one component and not the other. The primary distinction is with respect to lobbying activity. Public Citizen, Inc., an IRS § 501(c)(4) entity, lobbies Congress to advance Public Citizen’s mission of protecting public health and safety, advancing government transparency, and urging corporate accountability. Public Citizen Foundation, however, is an IRS § 501(c)(3) organization. Accordingly, its ability to engage in lobbying is limited by federal law, but it may receive donations that are tax-deductible by the contributor. Public Citizen Inc. does most of the lobbying activity discussed on the Public Citizen Web site. Public Citizen Foundation performs most of the litigation and education activities discussed on the Web site.

You may make a contribution to Public Citizen, Inc., Public Citizen Foundation, or both. Contributions to both organizations are used to support our public interest work. However, each Public Citizen component will use only the funds contributed directly to it to carry out the activities it conducts as part of Public Citizen’s mission. Only gifts to the Foundation are tax-deductible. Individuals who want to join Public Citizen should make a contribution to Public Citizen, Inc., which will not be tax deductible.

To become a member of Public Citizen, click here.
To become a member and make an additional tax-deductible donation to Public Citizen Foundation, click here.