Call Your Representative Today and Request the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Draft Texts

Request the TPP Draft Texts and Make Your Representative Realize Congress Is Also Being Kept in the Dark

Working behind closed doors, unelected negotiators are rewriting wide swaths of our domestic food safety, Internet freedom, medicine pricing and other non-trade policies through the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) “trade” agreement. The public, press and our elected representatives aren’t even allowed to see the texts. Talks have been underway for three years and President Obama wants to sign a deal this October!

Meanwhile, 600 official corporate advisors – people from places like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Walmart and Big Pharma companies like Pfizer and Abbott Laboratories – have special access to the TPP texts.

By calling your member of Congress and requesting a copy of the TPP texts, you can help make your representative realize he or she is also being shut out, and that negotiators are trying to do an end run around the Constitution – which gives Congress exclusive authority over the terms of trade agreements.

Call the U.S. Capitol switchboard at (202) 224-3121 and ask them to connect you to your representative’s office. Use the appropriate script below to ask for your copy of the TPP draft texts:

Script for Democratic Members:

“Hello, my name is __{name}__ and I’m calling today about the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement currently under negotiation. The TPP would be the most significant international commercial agreement since the World Trade Organization with broad implications for U.S. jobs, food safety, financial regulation, medicine prices and more. Negotiations have been underway for three years and President Obama wants to sign the deal this October. I’d appreciate it if Representative __{name}__ could send me a copy of the Trans-Pacific Partnership draft texts, and information about __{his/her}__ leadership to represent the public interest throughout this process.”

Script for Republican Members:

“Hello, my name is __{name}__ and I’m calling today about the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement currently under negotiation. Given the U.S. Constitution gives Congress exclusive authority over the substance of U.S. trade policy, I am requesting that you review the draft texts of the TPP negotiations before any deal is signed and cannot be changed.

Given the Obama administration has been doing these negotiations for three years and President Obama wants to sign the deal this October, I’d appreciate it if Representative __{name}__ could send me a copy of the Trans-Pacific Partnership draft texts. I would also like information about __{his/her}__ leadership to make sure this agreement doesn’t submit the U.S to the jurisdiction of the foreign tribunals included in other Obama trade deals and what is being done to preserve Congress’s constitutional authority throughout this process.”


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