Poor Construction on the Keystone XL Pipeline Increases the Risk of a Tar Sands Oil Spill

Congressional Oversight Hearings are Needed on the Keystone XL Pipeline Construction to Protect Health and Safety of the Public and Environment

The bad news about the Keystone XL pipeline just keeps coming.

After months of research, Public Citizen has brought to light the grave risks posed by sub-standard construction of the southern portion of the Keystone XL pipeline. Poor welds, dents and other problems in the pipeline have led to TransCanada excavating it in 125 places to conduct repairs.

TransCanada’s poor safety record speaks for itself. The company’s Bison natural gas pipeline exploded within the first six months of operation, and the first phase of Keystone XL spilled 14 times in the first 14 months of its operation, according to the State Department’s August 2011 report on the pipeline.

Now TransCanada wants us to believe that all of the “anomalies” — that’s how they refer to over 200 instances of poor construction — have been identified and fixed and the pipeline is safe.

Say “no” to trusting TransCanada.


Send an Email Calling for Congressional Oversight Hearings on the Safety of the Southern Segment of the Keystone XL Pipeline.


We will deliver copies of all letters submitted to the House of Representative Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials and the Senate Subcommittee on Surface Transportation and Merchant Marine Infrastructure, Safety, and Security.


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