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Trade Data Center

Debunking Trade Myths

To hide the facts about failed trade policies, proponents are changing the data

Submit a Comment for the Record Opposing “Factoryless Goods” — the Latest Duplicitous Attempt to Justify Unfair Trade

Comment Period Closes Soon, So Take Action Today!

Instead of responding to the American public’s demand to replace our failed NAFTA-style trade deals, some in the administration want to cover up the evidence of these pacts’ damage. They have put together what they call the Economic Classification Policy Committee (ECPC) to launch an assault on fair trade with a sneaky proposal known as “factoryless goods.”

Under this proposal, an iPhone made in China and sold in Europe could somehow perversely count as a U.S. manufactured export. American firms like Apple that have offshored their production jobs would be reclassified as “factoryless goods producers.”

The proposal would disguise the erosion of U.S. manufacturing caused in part by unfair trade policies. It would deceptively deflate the widely reported U.S. manufacturing trade deficit and artificially inflate American manufacturing jobs.

Submit a comment for the record to keep the “factoryless goods” proposal from becoming a reality. Feel free to add your own thoughts to the draft comments we provided below. You also can view the notice for this lunatic proposal in the Federal Register for yourself, and review some tips for writing an effective comment. The comment period ends July 21, so please act today.

Use the Form Below to Submit an Official Comment for the Record Opposing “Factoryless Goods”


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