President Obama, Close the Dark Money Corruption Loophole and Fight for Disclosure

Urge the President to Require Corporations that do Business with the Government to Disclose their Political Spending

 

Corporations that receive government contracts can secretly funnel untold sums to help elect (and re-elect) the very same lawmakers who are responsible for — you guessed it — awarding government contracts.

It’s a cycle of corruption enabled by a detestable loophole in election law.

But there’s good news: Closing the corrupting loophole doesn’t require an act of Congress. President Obama has the authority to fix the problem with the stroke of a pen.

Urge the president to sign an executive order requiring federal contractors to disclose their political spending

Petition to President Obama:

 

We, the undersigned strongly support requiring corporations that bid for government contracts to disclose their campaign spending. Americans have a right to know that government contracts are being awarded based on merit, not money.

A photograph of President Barack Obama

Spread The Word


share on Facebook


Learn More

Join Our Social Networks



Copyright © 2016 Public Citizen. All rights reserved. This Web site is shared by Public Citizen Inc. and Public Citizen Foundation.
Learn More about the distinction between these two components of Public Citizen.


Public Citizen, Inc. and Public Citizen Foundation

Together, two separate corporate entities called Public Citizen, Inc. and Public Citizen Foundation, Inc., form Public Citizen. Both entities are part of the same overall organization, and this Web site refers to the two organizations collectively as Public Citizen.

Although the work of the two components overlaps, some activities are done by one component and not the other. The primary distinction is with respect to lobbying activity. Public Citizen, Inc., an IRS § 501(c)(4) entity, lobbies Congress to advance Public Citizen’s mission of protecting public health and safety, advancing government transparency, and urging corporate accountability. Public Citizen Foundation, however, is an IRS § 501(c)(3) organization. Accordingly, its ability to engage in lobbying is limited by federal law, but it may receive donations that are tax-deductible by the contributor. Public Citizen Inc. does most of the lobbying activity discussed on the Public Citizen Web site. Public Citizen Foundation performs most of the litigation and education activities discussed on the Web site.

You may make a contribution to Public Citizen, Inc., Public Citizen Foundation, or both. Contributions to both organizations are used to support our public interest work. However, each Public Citizen component will use only the funds contributed directly to it to carry out the activities it conducts as part of Public Citizen’s mission. Only gifts to the Foundation are tax-deductible. Individuals who want to join Public Citizen should make a contribution to Public Citizen, Inc., which will not be tax deductible.

To become a member of Public Citizen, click here.
To become a member and make an additional tax-deductible donation to Public Citizen Foundation, click here.