Did You Participate in the First Earth Day?

Public Citizen would like to hear your story. Send us an email at energy@citizen.org with the subject “First Earth Day” and include the following information in your Earth Day story:

  • What city was the Earth Day event in?
  • What type (rally, demonstration, teach-in, direct action) of event was it?
  • What inspired you to participate in Earth Day?
  • Do you still participate in environmental events?
  • Can we share your story on Public Citizen’s blog, CitizenVox?

Why Reduce Carbon from Power Plants?

Fossil fuel burning power plants are the single largest source of dangerous carbon pollution in our nation. The proposed EPA rule for new power plants will limit carbon dioxide emissions for any new coal-fired power plant and will finally begin to level the playing field for technologies such as wind, solar, geothermal and energy efficiency, which have been forced to compete against heavily subsidized fossil fuels, including coal.

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